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Transitions

Military life is full of changes. You travel for training, move to new duty stations and deploy—often many times.

You may be getting ready for your first move or your third deployment. Wherever you are, each new stage in your military career brings new challenges. These challenges could be moving to a new town, finding housing, arranging childcare or organizing finances. Dealing with these can put stress on you, your family and friends.

Fortunately, proper preparation can ease you through transitions. Our available resources can help you with deployment support, reintegration, moving and more.

Recommended Resources

Peer Support for Military Spouses

Military spouses of service members face unique stressors. They often cope with multiple deployments, frequent moves, long separations and concerns about their loved one’s future. Many times they even have to manage a household and family alone. These realities of military life can take a toll on military spouses and impact the entire family. Children often take their emotional cues from their parents, so a parent’s anxiety can result in a stressful environment for the entire household. That is why it is important to address concerns as early as possible.  

Boosting Family Readiness

Change is constant for many families, but even more so for military families who regularly adapt to new surroundings due to experiencing relocations, adjusting to new routines when a family member is deployed, and facing the daily grind of operational stress.

Preparing for Deployment

Deployments can be challenging for service members, their families and friends. Fortunately, having a detailed plan helps you and your family during the transition.  

Whether it is your first deployment, or one of many, the following five tips can help you effectively cope with the challenges ahead.

1. Get Your Paperwork in Order

Start with the basics by gathering important documents and giving them to someone you trust like a spouse, parent, sibling or close friend. The exact paperwork you should gather depends on your circumstances, but may include:

Maintaining Relationships with Loved Ones During Deployment

Military spouses and significant others provide an invaluable source of support to today’s service members. Loved ones can play a vital role in offering encouragement during a military career – especially during deployments when separation often goes hand-in-hand with concern for the safety of service members, coping as a single parent at home or worries about money or legal troubles.

Translating Military Experience to Civilian Employment

Transitioning out of uniform can be hard. Whether you are finishing one enlistment or retiring after 20 or more years, it is common to feel uncertain about your future—especially your career.

Finding a civilian job isn’t always easy. However, employment is important not just for your finances. It can also help your psychological health and overall well-being.

Using Social Media to Stay Connected

Having a strong social network helps support your psychological health and keeps you mission ready. Feeling connected is especially important during tough times. However, frequent moves and deployments can make it hard to maintain close relationships. Fortunately, positive social media use can help you keep up with friends and family, and get or give support when the going gets tough.

Positive Social Media Use

The following are positive ways you can use social media to support psychological health:

Tags: Transitions