If you need immediate help, please call 911 or the Military Crisis Line at 800-273-8255 and press 1

Stress & Anxiety

The demands of military life are challenging. Whether at home or abroad, service members regularly face difficult situations that can cause stress and anxiety.

When left unchecked, these feelings can last weeks or months, get worse, or interfere with your duties at home and in uniform. For this reason, it is important to reach out to your health care provider if you feel intense or lasting stress or anxiety. Your provider can work with you to manage your symptoms and keep you mission ready. Use the following resources to learn about stress, anxiety and other related topics.

Recommended Resources

Peer Support Resources for Members of the National Guard, Reserve and Individual Augmentees

Members of the National Guard, Reserve and individual augmentees are in unique positions. These citizen-warriors often work full-time civilian jobs while still being a member of the armed forces. Individual augmentees may receive orders or volunteer to deploy individually with a command that is not their own.

How Veterans can Navigate Change through Writing

Facing a major change such as separating from military service and readjusting to civilian life can be challenging for many veterans. Writing down your thoughts, feelings and experiences in a journal is one way to support your well-being throughout the transition process. Learn how you can start writing to strengthen your psychological health with the tips and resources below.

Understanding and Coping With Natural and Human-made Disasters

Traumatic events related to combat or deployments can occur during your military service. These experiences may cause stress reactions that can negatively impact your psychological health. However, it is important to remember that you and your family can face similar experiences following a natural or human-made disaster.

Peer Support for Military Spouses

Military spouses of service members face unique stressors. They often cope with multiple deployments, frequent moves, long separations and concerns about their loved one’s future. Many times they even have to manage a household and family alone. These realities of military life can take a toll on military spouses and impact the entire family. Children often take their emotional cues from their parents, so a parent’s anxiety can result in a stressful environment for the entire household. That is why it is important to address concerns as early as possible.  

Nutrition’s Role in Mission Readiness

Food is one of the most important drivers of good physical and psychological health. Proper nutrition provides the nutrients your brain needs to manage stress, regulate mood and emotions, maintain alertness and optimize physical and cognitive performance – all essential components of mission readiness. A diet rich in whole grains, nuts, beans, fruits and vegetables can even help lower the risk of depression.

Coping with Mass Shootings

It is important to remember that in any city or town, mass shootings are rare, even if they are highly visible occurrences that receive national attention.Most people will never experience one directly. However, when they do happen they are shocking and can be difficult to cope with. This is because they feel random and happen in places you consider safe like schools, offices, malls, movie theaters, restaurants—even military installations.