Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury in the News

  • Arts and Health, Psychology Today — 04/23/2014

    Art therapy is a field based on the concept that art making and the creative process can be leveraged to support health and well-being in children, adults, families and groups.

  • DoDLive Bloggers Roundtable: Coping with Deployment, DVIDS — 04/23/2014

    In honor of Month of the Military Child, the Real Warriors Campaign, in coordination with Defense Media Activity, will host a bloggers roundtable on April 22 from 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. EDT.

  • First findings of virtual reality exposure therapy for PTSD, Medical Press — 04/22/2014

    A randomized controlled clinical trial of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) found that shorter doses of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRE) reduces PTSD diagnoses and symptoms.

  • Mobile Vet Center to visit CSC campus this week, Chadron State College — 04/22/2014

    When a Vet Center is miles from home, it can be a long drive to access many services. The Mobile Vet Center makes it more convenient. These mobile centers focus on services that help veterans make the difficult transition between military and civilian life.

  • Operation Enduring Warrior inspires wounded veterans, Stars and Stripes — 04/21/2014

    A large part of OEW's mission is to encourage wounded servicemen to take on sports as a confidence booster.

  • DoDLive Bloggers Roundtable: Coping with Deployment, DoDLive — 04/21/2014

    In honor of Month of the Military Child, the Real Warriors Campaign, in coordination with Defense Media Activity, will host a bloggers roundtable on April 22 from 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. EDT.

  • Bond between veteran, stable owner forms new program, WBNG — 04/18/2014

    The gentle movement of a horse's stride and fresh air can be relaxing and therapeutic, making it a healing activity for veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other injuries.

  • Man's Best Friend Helps Traumatized Veterans Heal, livescience — 04/18/2014

    When U.S. Navy hospital corpsman Marshall Peters returned from a tour of duty in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2010, he couldn't sleep. He felt depressed and anxious, and hated being around crowds or loud noises. Like many veterans returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan, Peters was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

  • Out of the darkness and into the light, Bullard Banner News — 04/17/2014

    Upon his arrival home, Collett began suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a mental disorder triggered by a disturbing outside event. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs estimates PTSD afflicts 31 percent of Vietnam veterans.

  • Yoga helps build resilience for returning Louisiana Guard members and families, National Guard — 04/17/2014

    Introductory yoga became an elective course offering at Louisiana National Guard Yellow Ribbon Reintegration events beginning in 2012 and has quickly become a popular choice for Guard members and their family members.

  • Four legged animals helping wounded warriors, CarolinaLive — 04/16/2014

    Bethlehem Therapeutic Riding Stables is now home to a wounded warrior therapy program.

  • PTSD and war's effects on veterans can take a heavy toll on families, Newsday — 04/16/2014

    Although veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder or other emotional problems can get psychotherapy or mood-altering drug treatment from the Department of Veterans Affairs, families troubled by a loved one's war-related problems often don't know where to turn.

  • Local veteran opens up about struggles with PTSD, Journal News — 04/15/2014

    Mental health experts say therapies for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder have a 70 percent success rate, if the sufferer wants to get better.

  • Local PTSD veteran support grows, WCBD — 04/15/2014

    Counselors here in the Low Country say that they are seeing an increase in older veterans from wars like Vietnam coming forward, they say that's why they've open a second location at the Red Cross in North Charleston.

  • Anonymous online counseling for vets shows early success, Military Times — 04/14/2014

    Last year, nearly 9 million veterans — roughly 40 percent of the U.S. veteran population — used some type of VA health service. But officials believe that even more could benefit, especially in the realm of mental health.

Pages

PDF formatted documents require Adobe's free Acrobat Reader software. If you do not already have this software installed on your computer, please download it from Adobe's Website.